30 Sweet, Heartbreaking Things William and Harry Have Said About Princess Diana

Prince Harry

“I never really dealt with what had actually happened. So there was a lot of buried emotion, and I still didn’t even want to think about it.”

“I really regret not talking about it. It is OK to suffer, but as long as you talk about it. It is not a weakness. Weakness is having a problem and not recognizing it and not solving that problem.”

“It’s a huge shame she’s not here. But I hope she’d be incredibly proud of what we managed to achieve.”

“I first came [to Africa] in 1997, straight after my mum died. My dad told my brother and me to pack our bags – we were going to Africa to get away from it all.”

Britain’s Prince Harry visits Brockholes Nature Reserve in Preston, Lancashire, Britain, October 23, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Jackson/pool

“We will do everything we can to make sure she’s never forgotten, and carry on all of the special gifts and such that she had and that she portrayed when she was alive. I hope that a lot of my mother’s talents are shown in the work that I do.”

“I hope she’s looking down [at our family] with tears in her eyes being incredibly proud of what we’ve established. I’m sure she’s longing for me to have kids so she can be a grandmother again . . . but I hope that everything we do privately and officially, that it makes her proud.”

“Losing your mother at such a young age does end up shaping your life massively, of course it does. And now I find myself trying to be there and give advice to other people who are in similar positions.”

“Every day, depending on what I’m doing, I wonder what it would be like if she was here, and what she would say, and how she would be making everybody else laugh. Who knows what the situation would be, what the world would be like, if she were still around.”

“Not to get too personal, if you lose your mum at the age of 12 then you’ve got to deal with it and the idea that . . . 15, 17 years later I still hadn’t dealt with it, Afghan was the moment. I was like ‘right – deal with it.'”

“My mother had just died, and I had to walk a long way behind her coffin, surrounded by thousands of people watching me while millions more did on television. I don’t think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances. I don’t think it would happen today.”

Prince Harry takes part in a round table discussion with HIV doctors at King’s College Hospital in south London, Thursday, July 7, 2016, as part of his desire to learn more and raise public awareness in the fight against HIV and AIDS both internationally and in the UK. In the coming weeks Harry will meet with staff at a London sexual health clinic to see their work first-hand and also travel to Durban, South Africa to speak at the World AIDS conference.

“”My mother died when I was very young. I didn’t want to be in the position I was in, but I eventually pulled my head out of the sand, started listening to people and decided to use my role for good.”

“My mother took a huge part in showing me an ordinary life, including taking me and my brother to see homeless people. Thank goodness I’m not completely cut off from reality. People would be amazed by the ordinary life William and I live.”

“I intuitively know what my mother would like me to do and want to progress with work she couldn’t complete.”

“She had the most wonderful sense of humor and always wanted to make things fun for us, as well as protect us.”

Prince Harry visits Chatham House in London June 15, 2017
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“I think it’s never going to be easy for the two of us to talk about our mother, but 20 years on seems like a good time to remind people of the difference that she madenot just to the royal family, but also to the world.”

“I can’t necessarily remember what I said but all I do remember is regretting for the rest of my life how short the phone call was. If I’d known that that was the last time I was going to speak to my mother, the things I would have said to her. Looking back at it now – it’s incredibly hard. I have to deal with that for the rest of my life: not knowing that it was the last time I’d speak to my mum, how differently that conversation would have panned out if I’d had even the slightest inkling that her life was going to be taken that night.”

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